Salmon Safe Soapbox
Photo by Barry Kovish

Vineyards

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Willamette Valley Vineyards wins our "Hero of Salmon" Design Contest

The first time we saw one of those billboard-sized Willamette Valley Vineyards Salmon-Safe truck wraps on I-5 near Portland, we knew that we were reaching a new audience with a message about how wine growers our helping restore our salmon watersheds.


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Monday, March 14, 2011

Peeling Back the Label

Audubon Magazine

In the current food special issue, Audubon Magazine make sense of environmental claims on food products lining grocery store aisles. Here’s what they had to say about Salmon-Safe: 


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Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Oregon's food-friendly pinot gris

Washington Post

Many Oregon winemakers will tell you their pinot noir is the best wine to pair with salmon. And they are not alone in that contention. Serving pinot noir with salmon has almost become gospel, one of those "but of course!" matches that brook no debate, such as cabernet with steak... Oregon today leads the nation in certifying vineyards for environmentally friendly farming practices. An umbrella certification, Oregon Certified Sustainable Wine, encompasses organic and biodynamic certifications, as well as Low Input Viticulture & Enology (LIVE) and Salmon Safe certification.


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Friday, August 20, 2010

Salmon-Safe Wines Catching on in the Northwest

KNDO/KNDU TV Tri-Cities, Yakima

You may have seen the words "Salmon Safe" on the wine list at your favorite restaurant. It's an earth-friendly practice that seems to be catching on in the Northwest and the Walla Walla Valley. According to the Salmon-Safe website, it says it "helps vineyards protect and restore salmon habitat by planting trees on streams, growing cover crops to control run-off, and apply natural methods to control weeds and pests." In Walla Walla, some growers have started Vinea, a trust of growers using salmon safe and sustainable practices.


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Wednesday, August 11, 2010

How Wine Can Save Salmon

Change.org

Uncorking a bottle of wine can elicit merriment, boost heart health, and even relieve stress. But one program brings another benefit to pouring a glass of vino — helping out struggling salmon populations. The Salmon-Safe certification program is taking off in America's Northwest and the Walla Walla Valley, regions famous for their cool-climate grape varietals like Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Riesling, and Pinot Noir. More than 220 vineyards in Oregon and Washington earned Salmon-Safe certification so far, and the interest continues to grow as fast as the grapes themselves.


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Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Chateau Ste. Michelle achieves Salmon-Safe certification for vast Columbia Basin acreage

Wines & Vines Magazine

Reducing carbon emissions, improving vineyard practices, reviewing water use—these are just some of the achievements and ambitions of Northwest wineries in 2010… One of the biggest moves came this week, with Chateau Ste. Michelle's announcement that its prize Cold Creek and Canoe Ridge vineyards had obtained certification through the Salmon-Safe Inc. and Low-Input Viticulture and Enology Inc. certification programs. Together, the two vineyards represent 1,368 acres of Columbia Valley vineyards—more than one-third of the winery's acreage in the state. "Those sites are much larger than our typical Willamette Valley vineyard site, which tends to be 50 acres or so,” Dan Kent, managing director of Portland-based Salmon-Safe Inc., told Wines & Vines. While the organization is no stranger to Washington state, it’s primarily been active in the Walla Walla Valley... Read the article.


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Sunday, August 24, 2008

Seven Good Causes, 15 Top Wines: New Green Wineries

Food & Wine Magazine

Vineyards around the country have found a multitude of ways to go green-not just by switching to sustainable or organic grape-growing, but by taking advantage of every other green initiative around as well...

Read the article


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Monday, September 24, 2007

Green Grapes Grow On Oregon

Eugene Register-Guard

Simply put, growing good grapes requires planting the right vines in the right soil in the right climate and letting nature do its work. Of course, it's never that simple. Growers are at the mercy of weather, soil conditions and pests in a never-ending quest to control a patch of ground that can produce fruit that will make good wine... The Salmon-Safe message resonates with residents in the Pacific Northwest in particular, who know how important the iconic fish is to the region's ecosystem...


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Sunday, June 24, 2007

Green revolutionaries: West Coast wine growers fight to save the environment

Wine Spectator, June 2007


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Thursday, May 24, 2007

How green is your red? As wineries gain sustainable certifications, shop carefully

Portland Tribune, May 2007
If you have trouble tasting the difference between a cabernet sauvignon and a pinot noir, the labels on a restaurant wine list or in the grocery store wine aisle can read like a foreign language. If, in addition, you would like your wine to be produced using sustainable practices, you may be even more overwhelmed by the various certification labels that promise just that. Help is on the way....


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